Threads of the Pattern

Week #4: The Garden

Posted on: August 9, 2012

As I’ve mentioned before, my grandmother (maternal) had this amazing green thumb. Possibly, it wasn’t a green thumb, but more of a green…aura? essence? Something like that, anyway, because I never once saw her actually -gardening-. When I knew her, she lived in a trailer with three of my cousins, whom she was caring for. She had a bit of a back yard, but not a whole lot of one. mostly just a path around the trailer with enough space for some patio furniture on the far side. The back wall was entirely covered in plants. Potted plants, that is.

Everything was growing in profusion. I think people just gave her plants because they knew she would keep them alive, but there were also some that were what I like to consider purposeful: herbs and vegetables. In amongst the spider plants, aloe plants and ferns, there were also tomatoes, cucumbers, basil, parsley, etc. I didn’t know most of the herbs at the time, but it’s pretty hard not to spot a tomato.

I never even saw her pick anything, though I’m sure she must have, when I was busy being a lazy teenager and sleeping until 10am and fighting with my cousins. My grandmother was not a woman to remain idle long, and there were always vegetables in the fridge (with the cup of bacon grease, and other homemade items that I couldn’t name at the time) and there were never rotten vegetables on the ground outside.

I wish I’d inherited her knack for keeping things alive so easily. Or at least learned her secrets! Maybe it’s been bad luck, but I’ve been struggling to get a garden going at all. Last year, we bought all these containers and tried to grow some root vegetables (onions, carrots, beets) and we got exactly zero result. Even the four tomato plants only yielded one tiny cherry tomato. It was a pitiful harvest.

 

This year, I had some scallions, basil, and dill. Now I only have the basil left, and it’s just barely hanging on by a thread. For the scallions, I blame the heat. These were scallions I bought from the store, used the greens and then put the whites in a jar of water. For a while they were growing like crazy, and all I had to do was change the water every once in a while. Then the heat hit and they just shriveled up and died. Not sure what happened to the dill. Possibly also the heat, but it wasn’t around long enough for me to tell.

 

So, I don’t really have much in the way of gardening tools, but what I do have was in a cut off paper bag. It worked fine at first, but that is not a long term solution. It also meant that things weren’t really very visible. So when this week’s challenge came around, I grabbed a basket that wasn’t being used for anything else, and started transferring everything useful. It turns out, we had some seeds and onion bulbs that were no good in that bag. I had completely forgotten about them. Poor things. 
I should get a baggie for the twist ties, but I didn’t think of it at the time. 

 

 

Is it just me, or do they seem to be getting greener already? I think it’s weird that the cuttings (far left) are growing so much more nicely than the original stalks with roots.

As in previous weeks, I’m following Home Storage Solution’s 52 weeks to an organized home challenge. Feel free to jump in any time! The next two weeks are basement and attic focused. My basement is already organized, thanks to a crack in the foundation that we had to pack up and move everything for, and I don’t have an attic to speak of, so we’ll see how the next two weeks go.
I’m open to any gardening advice anyone is willing to share, as well! Note: dipping your thumb in acrylic paint has absolutely no effect.

 

~Rosie

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3 Responses to "Week #4: The Garden"

Looks like they’re doing so well…especially the cuttings! The cuttings may be doing better since the original stalks look as though they turning woody…give it time, the bottoms may catch up yet since they do have new growth on them. Provided they get enough sun and are on a regular watering schedule. Fertilizing also helps. I think most plants seem to die from either a lack of water or too much water.

,I always have trouble finding that balance between too much and not enough water. Generally I just feel the soil. I know basil comes from a more moist climate than Ohio, so I try to get the dirt to feel like a wet sponge? I have no idea if that’s right. Lol Thanks so much for stopping by and sharing your knowledge!

I usually let the top of the dirt dry some…maybe about 1-2″ down depending on the plant and whether it is root bound. I always recommend to everybody unsure to check the plant every 1-2 days if inside, and daily outside. Then you’ll be able to figure out a watering schedule.

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