Threads of the Pattern

Posts Tagged ‘science experiments

In the way that most preteens do, my daughter decided to wait until the very last moment to inform me that she had to have something for science on Monday that:
1. Had to fit into a brown paper bag bag the size of a lunchbox, and
2. Could be experimented upon.

The rules and regulations for said experimentation were dodged around and avoided, and then I learned it was because no matter what her teacher had suggested, she had decided she only wanted to experiment on those grow your own dinosaur tablet thingies. You know…the things that look like medicine and you put them into water and watch them burst out, roaring mightily! (or at least, they did in my imagination…)
So one trip to the Dollar Store later, we had dinosaur tablets and nothing to do with them. We decided she could try and see how they developed in water, salt water and….hey! How about slime?!

Oh. My. God. Do you have any idea how many recipes on the Internet are for Nickelodeon type slime?? Do you know how many of them involve Borax, Clear glue, liquid latex or anything else not easily found under your kitchen sink on a Sunday afternoon? Finally, when I was in the middle of reaching for the wine bottle in desperation, we came across one that stated it was borax free and perfectly safe! And so…a blogpost was born.

Ask.com‘s version of Borax free, Nickelodeon Slime.
(btw…when I think of slime…I thought of THIS. This,however, is not what my daughter wanted. We will definitely be making that though, on a very in the near future time frame. Cause that stuff is rad.)
Anyway, The ingredients are:
2 cups water
4 cup cornstarch
Food coloring of choice.

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The first thing I learned about making slime was this: my daughter can -not- scoop cornstarch! She had white powder substance -everywhere!- But that was ok…what experiments are neat and orderly?

Cornstarch, cornstarch everywhere!

Cornstarch, cornstarch everywhere!

We warmed the water on the stovetop, slowly adding in¬† cups of cornstarch. I stirred, she poured, and we both waited. I’m not sure what exactly we thought was going to happen, but we were a little dissapointed when all that we could see was white water.

I thought it was an excellent idea to use the strainer to prevent lumpy slime.

I thought it was an excellent idea to use the strainer to prevent lumpy slime.

So, we deviated from the plan. We added in a cup of flour, because surely 4 cups of cornstach was a lot?
We turned down the heat on the stove because that’s what the instructions said to do. It didn’t make sense to me, since every time I’ve used cornstarch in gravy you’re supposed to wait til it boils but…who am I to judge? I’m¬†certainly not the expert in slime development!

Then we stirred. And stirred. And it just stayed…..blah. Milky. Weak!
So we added another cup of flour. And another cup of cornstarch. And we stirred.

Still milky water!

Still milky water!

I think it was about at this time that my daughter looked at me and said, ” Are you sure you didn’t just make this up?”
It was also at this point that I said to myself, ” The Internet lies!!!”
All in all, it wasn’t too bad. It came to a consistency very much like gravy, so we decided it into two bowls and added food coloring.

No, it wasn't Christmas time slime...just the food coloring we had the most!

No, it wasn’t Christmas time slime…just the food coloring we had the most!

My eldest daughter, by the way, despises the color pink, and of course insisted that I have no idea what I’m talking about and used an entire container of red food coloring proving to us both that I was right and no amount of red food coloring is going to make white goo red. Instead it just becomes more vibrantly pink!

red plus red plus red still equals pink.

red plus red plus red still equals pink.

She was not amused.
But I was!
A few hours later we took the slime out of the fridge and stirred. It seems the longer its cold, the firmer it gets. Nice to know!

Just...ew.

Just…ew.

Oh, and the science project? Success, though we inadvertently also learned that it goes bad after a week, fridge or no.
And when it goes bad, it smells like moldy death.

Sig



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